Mikimo Sosumi :: Disco Kill Disco (Daddy Tank)

Extraterrestrial soundscapes for long term audio consumption. Broken IDM construction welded to faded disco rumblings. Voices come from afar, and yet it all wisps by in a throbbing percussive jolt that ricochets back and forth with a bewildering style.

Mikim Sosumi :: Disco Kill Disco (Daddy Tank)

When there’s something special and unique to display, Daddy Tank is the label to spotlight. Still content to stay in the shadows, they seem to adhere to and cultivate a back-end electronic hub of musicians where pigeonholing a genre is elusive and unnecessary. Home to several releases by Dissolved as well as Mitoma, Social Studies and others, Disco Kill Disco by Mikimo Sosumi is an impacting album with strange musical tentacles in its reach.

The unfamiliar Mikimo Sosumi unseals 9-tracks of erratic analog-to-digital formations. Loose cables dangling from flickering light boxes, vintage knobs and sliders are operated by a mad-scientist and it all glides by in an experimental disco inferno trapped within stomping techno corridors. What is ever-present is the voice.

To compare and contrast, imagine, if you will, Super_Collider’s Head On (Loaded, 1999) meshed with Team Doyobi’s Digital Music Vol.1 (Skam, 2012). Or classic-era Funkstörung Disconnected (Studio !K7, 2004) and Mouse On Mars’ Disk Dusk (Sonig, 1999). But what do these albums have in common besides eroded electronics broadcasting via distant channels in outer space? They all elicit a unique artistic approach to electronic music production, one that morphs several genres (funk, bass, disco, electronic, bass, IDM and dub) with emphasis on treated vocal contortions. Mikimo Sosumi’s definitive vocal extracts are ripped to shreds on a (similar yet distant) platform of electrical blips and bleeps, not unlike the aforementioned.

Dabbling into the far recesses of complex brain structures, Disco Kill Disco finds a nesting place that you never knew existed. Extraterrestrial soundscapes for long term audio consumption. Broken IDM construction welded to faded disco rumblings. Voices come from afar, and yet it all wisps by in a throbbing percussive jolt that ricochets back and forth with a bewildering style. Purple is indeed the new black.

Disco Kill Disco is available on Daddy Tank.

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