Project STS-31 :: Spiralgalaxie (Solar One)

Frosted spacewalks juxtaposed by cerebral machinations, fragile soundscapes and minimal ambience, in a record that brings together a founding father and modern day trailblazer for a future classic.

Project STS-31 :: Spiralgalaxie (Solar One)

Electronic music can be fickle, especially when it comes to popularity. Some artists are launched into notoriety, seemly ascending into regard and respect with little rhyme nor reason behind their success. On the other end of this spectrum are those whose ability and talent have garnered attention from press and the greater population alike. Robert Witschakowski belongs to this second strata.

The Exaltics, Witschakowski’s most prolific moniker, has brought a plethora of sounds to the ears of the faithful. Eerie electro, elegant electronics, thoughtful techno and acrid acid. But I dare say that Project STS-31 must be up there with one of this artist’s proudest collaborations; a partnership with Gerald Donaldson (of Drexciya and Dopplereffekt fame.)

In reality Spiralgalaxie is not solely a collaborative album. In fact, the third in the Hubble Telescope series is a compilation that draws on Witsch’s and Donald’s many pseudonyms as well as their new work together. The vinyl version only has two of the duo’s tracks, with the CD offering four. The title piece is a stripped, a pared down work of astral abstraction to introduce the listener to this star strewn assortment. Their other outing, “50000 Light Years Away” rumbles, juddering bass and a snapping beat allowing for some dancefloor flexibility. But the floor isn’t what this duo are focusing on, the heavens and man´s place in them is the narrative.

The pair diverge, delivering tracks from different nom de plumes. The Exaltics’ “NGC 253” soars, synths floating into the heaven with snares keeping time. Donning his Robert Heise mantle, the Jena man carves out a frigid piece of introspection.

Donald’s additions are just as varied. From the clinical “Adaptive Optics” by Heinrich Mueller to the star gazing chills of Der Zyklus’ “Ionospheric Delay.” The most reduced addition comes under from the Detroit man´s Rudolf Klorzeiger guise, with Crotaphytus following suit with the barren atmospherics of “GJ 1214 b.”

Spiralgalaxie is Solar One Music‘s fortieth release, marking ten years for the label. And what a way to celebrate that achievement. The compilation celebrates the similarities and differences of the respective artists. Frosted spacewalks juxtaposed by cerebral machinations, fragile soundscapes and minimal ambience, in a record that brings together a founding father and modern day trailblazer for a future classic.

Spiralgalaxie is available on Solar One.

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