Costolloe & Nick Simoncino :: Double review (Signal Code)

These two records give a wide view of what this imprint has been up to over the last few years. A range of styles are explored with the focus being both on and off the dancefloor. Rich textures, cold moments, introspection and retrospection. If you haven’t checked out Signal Code yet get the thumb out and get listening.

Costolloe & Nick Simoncino :: Double review (Signal Code)

Ireland does well for its size. By that I mean it’s small and fairly well know. There are Irish people everywhere and for the just over four million of us we fair punch above our weight in terms of sport and drinking ability. Despite this when I get knocked the ole, “De donde ere?” here in Madrid my response of “Irlanda” is 99% of the time met with “Holanda!” And lemme tell ya, I can roll them “Rrrrrr”s. Then again, the realisation of Ireland is generally met with cheeriness. I guess our nationality, and our lack of historical animosity, has led to a general like of the Irish. But, we haven’t been that successful in the world of electronic music. There are some, Decal, Apartment Records, Lerosa, but we’ve always been underrated behind the synths. And within the ranks of Irish machine musicians there is one which I would say is that bit more unsung than the others.

Aaron Costelloe has slowly but surely been developing both his label and his own artistic style since 2011. From day one the Dublin imprint has been rooted in the classic styles of house and electro and of course techno. Their latest duo of releases brings together all three genres with some quality results.

Inflex is almost a split EP, of sorts. The head honcho offers up the central source material with the title piece. Costelloe sets the ball rolling with the original. A stripped down affair, crisp snares keep time as sleek and slender synthlines are selected. A coldness frosts over the piece, shivers while skygazing on a November night. The Dublin man always brings to mind 90s UK techno with the soul and spirit he imbibes into his music. Glasgow’s Marco Bernardi take up his role with two remixes. The Frustrated Funk alumni picks up on those twilight inspired melodies, sculpting a deep and thoughtful remix. The mood turns dark on the flip with a bitter bleep pocked acid eroded reduced remake.

The next pairing some vinyl space are Nick Simoncino and DJ Sotofett. Simoncino is no stranger to Signal Code, having done some excellent remix work on Costolloe’s Solar Code. For Spiagge the Italian offers up three works Spiaggia Misano, Spiaggia Riccione and Spiaggia Rimini. As can be expected, house is the style but as ever the Mathematics alumni delivers it in his own unique way. 4/4 thump and storms of snare are mellowed by sweet strings. Heavy pound softened by pin pricks of light. Ferocity is soothed by tempered toms. The dancefloor and the headphones at home are catered for in the A-Side’s trio. The flip is occupied by DJ Sotofett for an epic remix of some sixteen minutes. The Swede is in his usual anything goes mood. Sitting somewhere on the outskirts of definition the Wania Mania veteran delivers a deep, dense and very different interpretation.

These two records give a wide view of what this imprint has been up to over the last few years. A range of styles are explored with the focus being both on and off the dancefloor. Rich textures, cold moments, introspection and retrospection. If you haven’t checked out Signal Code yet get the thumb out and get listening.

Both releases are available on Signal Code.

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