Carl Finlow / Dez Williams :: Bleem ​/ ​Interference Pattern split EP (Bass Agenda)

An EP of gnarled and grinding gears, of twisted metal and jagged sounds from two artists illustrating why they are well considered among Britain’s electro elite.

Carl Finlow / Dez Williams :: Split EP (Bass Agenda)

I would argue that the UK has been the breeding ground of electro’s revival. Actually, that statement would imply that the colder edge of electronics had subsided in Britain when in fact it never really did. Nevertheless, labels like Brokntoys, CPU and Cultivated Electronics have proven fertile ground from which homegrown talent and international artists have taken root and grown. Bass Agenda is thriving in this same soil, with digital buds sprouting with vinyl releases being that bit rarer.

Following a split EP earlier in the year from Dmitry Distant and Lectromagnetique comes a second from these frosted funk stalwarts; Carl Finlow and Dez Williams. Finlow is up first, occupying the A-side with two tracks of shadowy mechanics. “Bleem” is cold, sinister and wonderfully intimate. Cascading chords are worried by thick basslines, beats reduced to a support role in this arcing futurescape. “Chemical Bonds” comes from a more aquatic place. Snares are fortified as synths harpoon the depths. Williams takes his cue from this serrated sound. The acid tongued “Interference Pattern” is a clinical and stripped back stomp, a caustic and severe style carried into the heavy drums and grimacing “Dayzov V1.1.” The Elektronik Religion founder does not relent. The closer, “Whitey,” is a bitter a bare piece. Monosyllabic and monstrous, a beast of rusted circuit-boards and gravel to crush the last remnants of speakers.

It’s a curious thing that this pair should share a 12” at this point in these respective careers. Dez Williams is finally gaining some much deserved recognition, recent releases for Bedouin, Shipwrec and New Flesh reflecting this. Carl Finlow has taken a step back after years of hyper productivity, but the edge certainly hasn’t been lost. An EP of gnarled and grinding gears, of twisted metal and jagged sounds from two artists illustrating why they are well considered among Britain’s electro elite.

Split EP is available Bass Agenda.

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