Arrakis. Dune. French Techno? :: The World of Epsylonn-Otoktone Sound System

At Dune’s core is a tough style of techno, a harsh and heavy sound that is more like 1991 rather than 10191. Yet, with the passage of time, the imprint is branching out and looking into other areas of electronic space.

In 1965 Dune was released. Frank Herbert’s universe of 10191 spoke of instantaneous travel, other worlds and a mystical vision of a future human race brought rightful acclaim and saw the author become one of the most respected science fiction writers of the 20th century.

Dune Records, founded in 2007 by Epsylonn-Otoktone Sound System, is inspired by Herbert’s work but not in a “spice” induced dreamscape way, nor is the French label terra-mapping an audio world of shifting sands and prophet kings. This French imprint hammers floors with aggressive sonic weapons, like certain Fremen did.

“Techno. We love Techno! In all its diversity and richness” admits Liên, one of the founders, and the man behind much of the design work, of Dune. Traversing the many styles that techno encompasses, a wide seam if genres have been mined.

Kad’s Dune HS2992 collects four no-nonsense tracks. Made for big rooms and squalid dens of depravity, Kad allows for lengthy builds and heady breaks in pieces like “Strange Sheep” where a more aggressive line is taken for “The Old Fabric.” The slow burning “Deep Space” is one of the stand out tracks of the 12”, a smoldering acid affair of intense reductions.

909 Resistance comes from a similar lineage. Hs3003 brings together three tracks of tempered aggression. 303 surges come to the surface, rising into an acrid bellow of squawk and snare. “Modulazione” is a bending, curving work carved for the floor but “Ondulacion” is quite another beast. Chords are minced into an acidic paste before being smeared on a canvas of bass and hi-hats.

But just like a spice induced trip, minds are open. “As we grow we become more demanding, but also more open.” A decade in and new realms and universes are ready to be explored. “And as we don’t want to confine ourselves in a strict musical aesthetics, we also created “Echoes” sublabel (first EP in progress.)” Another sublabel has just landed.

The recent founding of Arrakis is a continuation of the dark room acid project first set in motion, a second moon if you will. “So, we don’t intend to stop neither to restrain our production of Dune’s spices but we now have two stands: Arrakis appearing more as some kinda “acid dancefloor jewels dealer,” muses Liên. Established with a compilation, four 303 corrupted big floor bangers are offered. Speaker cones quake as the clock is turned back. Universal Indicator style, glow stick, dust masks, raver odysseys are the ticket to the heart of the Empire’s spice trade.

At Dune’s core is a tough style of techno, a harsh and heavy sound that is more like 1991 rather than 10191. Yet, with the passage of time, the imprint is branching out and looking into other areas of electronic space. Liên finishes our chat with a desire, “we want to embrace this diversity (of techno) and give another opportunity to artists to be listened to.” With two new sublabels, and this aim to seek out new sounds, Dune looks, like its fictional predecessor, to be fertile ground for something special. Time, and space, will tell.

For more about Dune, visit their website at dune-records.com. [Bandcamp | Soundcloud | Facebook]

TAGS: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.